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  1. screenshot of Google’s new reCAPTCHA has a dark side

    Katharine Schwab

    Google’s new reCAPTCHA has a dark side

    Because reCaptcha v3 is likely to be on every page of a website, if you’re signed into your Google account there’s a chance Google is getting data about every single webpage you go to that is embedded with reCaptcha v3—and there many be no visual indication on the site that it’s happening, beyond a small reCaptcha logo hidden in the corner.

  2. screenshot of Link Targets and 3.2.5

    Adrian Roselli

    Link Targets and 3.2.5

    Regardless of what accessibility conformance level you target, do not arbitrarily open links in a new window or tab. If you are required to do so anyway, inform users in text.

  3. screenshot of Deep dive CSS: font metrics, line-height and vertical-align

    Vincent De Oliveira

    Deep dive CSS: font metrics, line-height and vertical-align

    Line-height and vertical-align are simple CSS properties. So simple that most of us are convinced to fully understand how they work and how to use them. But it’s not. They really are complex, maybe the hardest ones, as they have a major role in the creation of one of the less-known feature of CSS: inline formatting context.

  4. screenshot of Hydration

    Jeremy Keith

    Hydration

    The layered approach of progressive enhancement echoes the separation of concerns in the front-end stack: HTML, CSS, and JavaScript—each layer expressing more power. But while these concepts are related, they’re not interchangable. Separating out the layers of your tech stack isn’t necessarily progressive enhancement. If you have some HTML that relies on JavaScript to be useful, then there’s no benefit in separating that HTML into a separate payload. The HTML that you initially send down the wire needs to be functional (at least at a basic level) before the JavaScript arrives.