Sebastiano Guerriero avatar Sebastiano Guerriero

Chameleonic Header

Screenshot of “Chameleonic Header”

I remember seing a clever design years ago that had this effect on scroll, but it was just for a logo, with a single image.

Now that we have clip-path in CSS, with good support for the <basic shape> flavour, it can be used on any element.


  1. screenshot of Our web design tools are holding us back

    Vasilis van Gemert

    Our web design tools are holding us back

    nowadays we can build things with CSS that are impossible to create with our design tools. We have scroll-snap, we have complicated animations, we have all kinds of wonderful interaction, grid, flexbox, all kinds of shapes, and so much more that you won’t find in the drop down menus of your tool of choice. Yet our websites still look and behave like they were designed with photoshop.

  2. screenshot of Why We're Breaking Up with CSS-in-JS

    Sam Magura

    Why We're Breaking Up with CSS-in-JS

    Thanks for reading this deep dive into runtime CSS-in-JS. Like any technology, it has its pros and cons. Ultimately, it's up to you as a developer to evaluate these pros and cons and then make an informed decision about whether the technology is right for your use case. For us at Spot, the runtime performance cost of Emotion far outweighed the DX benefits, especially when you consider that the alternative of Sass Modules + utility classes still has a good DX while providing vastly superior performance.

  3. screenshot of HTML and CSS techniques to reduce your JavaScript

    Anthony Ricaud avatar Anthony Ricaud

    HTML and CSS techniques to reduce your JavaScript

    relying on solutions provided natively by browsers enables you to benefit at low cost from the expertise of the community creating web standards. These solutions generally have the advantage of using less code, thus reducing maintenance efforts for a development team (for example, no need to update the libraries used).