Paint the Picture, Not the Frame: How Browsers Provide Everything Users Need

Eric describes the issues people can face while using browsers to navigate on the Web, with a lot of great accessibility hints.

people who feel they are rejected by a digital system will feel hurt and have their sense of autonomy reduced, even when they believe there isn’t another human directly responsible.

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some people (even those who have used a computer before) don’t understand the nuance of the various “layers” you navigate through to operate a computer: the hardware, the OS, the browser installed on the OS, the website the browser is displaying, the website’s modals and disclosure statements, etc. To them, the experience is flat.

Obviously, the part I'm more inclined to share is the one about allowing people to decide which size texts should be:

Browsers allow users to change their preferred default font size, resizing text across websites accordingly. Browsers excel at handling this setting when you write CSS that takes advantage of unitless line-height values and relative font-size units.

Some designers may feel that granting this liberty to users somehow detracts from their intended branding. Good designers understand that there’s more to branding than just how something looks.

Yes users do change font size, bear with it.